Census API: Datasets in /data and its descendants
TitleDescriptionVintageDataset NameGeography ListVariable ListTag ListExamplesDeveloper DocumentationAPI Base URL
75 datasets
1990 Decennial: Summary File 1Data files available from Census 2000 and the 2010 Census. This file presents 100-percent population and housing figures for the total population, for 63 race categories, and for many other race and Hispanic or Latino categories. This includes age, sex, households, household relationship, housing units, occupancy status, and tenure (whether the residence is owned or rented). Also included are selected characteristics for a limited number of race and Hispanic or Latino categories. The data are available for the U.S., regions, divisions, states, counties, county subdivisions, places, census tracts, block groups, blocks, metropolitan areas (2000), core based statistical areas (2010), American Indian and Alaska Native areas, tribal subdivisions, Hawaiian home lands, congressional districts, and ZIP Code Tabulation Areas. Data are available down to the block level for many tabulations, but only to the census-tract level for others. The 2010 Census SF 1 has some tables on the population in group quarters that are available only to the county level. Available on DVD and American FactFinder. The Census 2000 Summary File 1 data were released in three stages. Individual state files and two national files were released. The state-level data were released first, followed by the Advance National File, which covered the same data subjects, but includes national level summary data for areas that cross state boundaries such as whole metropolitan areas, whole American Indian areas, etc. The Final National File contains the same data subjects and geographic areas as the Advance National File, but adds the first available urban/rural and urbanized area data. For the most current release dates for these files, see the "Census 2000 Release Schedule" link on the AFFAmerican FactFinder Main Page. The 2010 Census Summaray File 1 data were released in stages. Individual state files and a national update were released in 2011. The SF 1 urban/rural update is planned for release in Fall 2012. This file contains the same data subjects as the previously released files, but for additional geography, including the urban and rural parts of the United States, regions, divisions, states, counties, and places; and urbanized areas and urban clusters. See the 2010 Census Data Products At A Glance1990sf1geographiesvariablestagsN/Adocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/1990/sf1
1990 Decennial Census of Population and Housing - Summary File 3: Summary File 3The census of population and housing, taken by the Census Bureau in years ending in 0 (zero). Article I of the Constitution requires that a census be taken every ten years for the purpose of reapportioning the U.S. House of Representatives. Title 13 of the U. S. Code provides the authorization for conducting the census in Puerto Rico and the Island Areas. After each decennial census, the results are released to the public in a variety of ways, including publishing multiple series of reports titled Census of Population and Housing. The abbreviation for these reports was CPH for some decades (including 1990 and 2010) and PHC for some decades (including 1970 and 2000).1990sf3geographiesvariablestagsexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/1990/sf3
2000 Decennial: Summary File 1Data files available from Census 2000 and the 2010 Census. This file presents 100-percent population and housing figures for the total population, for 63 race categories, and for many other race and Hispanic or Latino categories. This includes age, sex, households, household relationship, housing units, occupancy status, and tenure (whether the residence is owned or rented). Also included are selected characteristics for a limited number of race and Hispanic or Latino categories. The data are available for the U.S., regions, divisions, states, counties, county subdivisions, places, census tracts, block groups, blocks, metropolitan areas (2000), core based statistical areas (2010), American Indian and Alaska Native areas, tribal subdivisions, Hawaiian home lands, congressional districts, and ZIP Code Tabulation Areas. Data are available down to the block level for many tabulations, but only to the census-tract level for others. The 2010 Census SF 1 has some tables on the population in group quarters that are available only to the county level. Available on DVD and American FactFinder. The Census 2000 Summary File 1 data were released in three stages. Individual state files and two national files were released. The state-level data were released first, followed by the Advance National File, which covered the same data subjects, but includes national level summary data for areas that cross state boundaries such as whole metropolitan areas, whole American Indian areas, etc. The Final National File contains the same data subjects and geographic areas as the Advance National File, but adds the first available urban/rural and urbanized area data. For the most current release dates for these files, see the "Census 2000 Release Schedule" link on the AFFAmerican FactFinder Main Page. The 2010 Census Summaray File 1 data were released in stages. Individual state files and a national update were released in 2011. The SF 1 urban/rural update is planned for release in Fall 2012. This file contains the same data subjects as the previously released files, but for additional geography, including the urban and rural parts of the United States, regions, divisions, states, counties, and places; and urbanized areas and urban clusters. See the 2010 Census Data Products At A Glance2000sf1geographiesvariablestagsN/Adocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2000/sf1
2000 Decennial: Summary File 3This Census 2000 file presents data on the population and housing long form subjects such as income and education. It includes population totals for ancestry groups. It also includes selected characteristics for a limited number of race and Hispanic or Latino categories. The data are available for the U.S., regions, divisions, states, counties, county subdivisions, places, census tracts, block groups, metropolitan areas, American Indian and Alaska Native areas, tribal subdivisions, Hawaiian home lands, congressional districts, and Zip Code Tabulation Areas. Available on CD-ROM, DVD, and American FactFinder. After Census 2000, data on these subjects were produced from the American Community Survey or the Puerto Rico Community Survey.2000sf3geographiesvariablestagsN/Adocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2000/sf3
2007 Economic Census - All Sectors: Economy-Wide Key StatisticsThe Economic Census is the U.S. Government's official five-year measure of American business and the economy. It is conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau, and response is required by law. In October through December 2012, forms were sent out to nearly 4 million businesses, including large, medium and small companies representing all U.S. locations and industries. Respondents were asked to provide a range of operational and performance data for their companies.2007ewksgeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2007/ewks
2008 County Business Patterns: Business PatternsCounty Business Patterns (CBP) is an annual series that provides economic data by industry at the U.S., State, County and Metropolitan Area levels. This series includes the number of establishments, employment during the week of March 12, first quarter payroll, and annual payroll. CBP provides statistics for businesses with paid employees for the U.S., Puerto Rico, and the Island Areas.2008cbpgeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2008/cbp
2008 Nonemployer Statistics: Non Employer StatisticsNonemployer Statistics is an annual series that provides subnational economic data for businesses that have no paid employees and are subject to federal income tax. The data consist of the number of businesses and total receipts by industry. Most nonemployers are self-employed individuals operating unincorporated businesses (known as sole proprietorships), which may or may not be the owner's principal source of income. The majority of all business establishments in the United States are nonemployers, yet these firms average less than 4 percent of all sales and receipts nationally. Due to their small economic impact, these firms are excluded from most other Census Bureau business statistics (the primary exception being the Survey of Business Owners). The Nonemployers Statistics series is the primary resource available to study the scope and activities of nonemployers at a detailed geographic level. For complementary statistics on the firms that do have paid employees, refer to the County Business Patterns. Additional sources of data on small businesses include the Economic Census, and the Statistics of U.S. Businesses.2008nonempgeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2008/nonemp
2009 County Business Patterns: Business PatternsCounty Business Patterns (CBP) is an annual series that provides economic data by industry at the U.S., State, County and Metropolitan Area levels. This series includes the number of establishments, employment during the week of March 12, first quarter payroll, and annual payroll. CBP provides statistics for businesses with paid employees for the U.S., Puerto Rico, and the Island Areas.2009cbpgeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2009/cbp
2009 Nonemployer Statistics: Non Employer StatisticsNonemployer Statistics is an annual series that provides subnational economic data for businesses that have no paid employees and are subject to federal income tax. The data consist of the number of businesses and total receipts by industry. Most nonemployers are self-employed individuals operating unincorporated businesses (known as sole proprietorships), which may or may not be the owner's principal source of income. The majority of all business establishments in the United States are nonemployers, yet these firms average less than 4 percent of all sales and receipts nationally. Due to their small economic impact, these firms are excluded from most other Census Bureau business statistics (the primary exception being the Survey of Business Owners). The Nonemployers Statistics series is the primary resource available to study the scope and activities of nonemployers at a detailed geographic level. For complementary statistics on the firms that do have paid employees, refer to the County Business Patterns. Additional sources of data on small businesses include the Economic Census, and the Statistics of U.S. Businesses.2009nonempgeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2009/nonemp
2010 American Community Survey: 5-Year EstimatesThe American Community Survey (ACS) is a nationwide survey designed to provide communities a fresh look at how they are changing. The ACS replaced the decennial census long form in 2010 and thereafter by collecting long form type information throughout the decade rather than only once every 10 years. Questionnaires are mailed to a sample of addresses to obtain information about households -- that is, about each person and the housing unit itself. The American Community Survey produces demographic, social, housing and economic estimates in the form of 1-year, 3-year and 5-year estimates based on population thresholds. The strength of the ACS is in estimating population and housing characteristics. It produces estimates for small areas, including census tracts and population subgroups. Although the ACS produces population, demographic and housing unit estimates,it is the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program that produces and disseminates the official estimates of the population for the nation, states, counties, cities and towns, and estimates of housing units for states and counties. For 2010 and other decennial census years, the Decennial Census provides the official counts of population and housing units.2010acs5geographiesvariablestagsN/Adocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2010/acs5
2010 County Business Patterns: Business PatternsCounty Business Patterns (CBP) is an annual series that provides economic data by industry at the U.S., State, County and Metropolitan Area levels. This series includes the number of establishments, employment during the week of March 12, first quarter payroll, and annual payroll. CBP provides statistics for businesses with paid employees for the U.S., Puerto Rico, and the Island Areas.2010cbpgeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2010/cbp
2010 Nonemployer Statistics: Non Employer StatisticsNonemployer Statistics is an annual series that provides subnational economic data for businesses that have no paid employees and are subject to federal income tax. The data consist of the number of businesses and total receipts by industry. Most nonemployers are self-employed individuals operating unincorporated businesses (known as sole proprietorships), which may or may not be the owner's principal source of income. The majority of all business establishments in the United States are nonemployers, yet these firms average less than 4 percent of all sales and receipts nationally. Due to their small economic impact, these firms are excluded from most other Census Bureau business statistics (the primary exception being the Survey of Business Owners). The Nonemployers Statistics series is the primary resource available to study the scope and activities of nonemployers at a detailed geographic level. For complementary statistics on the firms that do have paid employees, refer to the County Business Patterns. Additional sources of data on small businesses include the Economic Census, and the Statistics of U.S. Businesses.2010nonempgeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2010/nonemp
2010 Decennial: Summary File 1Data files available from Census 2000 and the 2010 Census. This file presents 100-percent population and housing figures for the total population, for 63 race categories, and for many other race and Hispanic or Latino categories. This includes age, sex, households, household relationship, housing units, occupancy status, and tenure (whether the residence is owned or rented). Also included are selected characteristics for a limited number of race and Hispanic or Latino categories. The data are available for the U.S., regions, divisions, states, counties, county subdivisions, places, census tracts, block groups, blocks, metropolitan areas (2000), core based statistical areas (2010), American Indian and Alaska Native areas, tribal subdivisions, Hawaiian home lands, congressional districts, and ZIP Code Tabulation Areas. Data are available down to the block level for many tabulations, but only to the census-tract level for others. The 2010 Census SF 1 has some tables on the population in group quarters that are available only to the county level. Available on DVD and American FactFinder. The Census 2000 Summary File 1 data were released in three stages. Individual state files and two national files were released. The state-level data were released first, followed by the Advance National File, which covered the same data subjects, but includes national level summary data for areas that cross state boundaries such as whole metropolitan areas, whole American Indian areas, etc. The Final National File contains the same data subjects and geographic areas as the Advance National File, but adds the first available urban/rural and urbanized area data. For the most current release dates for these files, see the "Census 2000 Release Schedule" link on the AFFAmerican FactFinder Main Page. The 2010 Census Summaray File 1 data were released in stages. Individual state files and a national update were released in 2011. The SF 1 urban/rural update is planned for release in Fall 2012. This file contains the same data subjects as the previously released files, but for additional geography, including the urban and rural parts of the United States, regions, divisions, states, counties, and places; and urbanized areas and urban clusters. See the 2010 Census Data Products At A Glance2010sf1geographiesvariablestagsexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2010/sf1
2011 American Community Survey 1-Year Profiles for the 113th Congressional DistrictsThe American Community Survey (ACS) is a nationwide survey designed to provide communities a fresh look at how they are changing. The ACS replaced the decennial census long form in 2010 and thereafter by collecting long form type information throughout the decade rather than only once every 10 years. Questionnaires are mailed to a sample of addresses to obtain information about households -- that is, about each person and the housing unit itself. The American Community Survey produces demographic, social, housing and economic estimates in the form of 1-year, 3-year and 5-year estimates based on population thresholds. The strength of the ACS is in estimating population and housing characteristics. The 3-year data provide key estimates for each of the topic areas covered by the ACS for the nation, all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, every congressional district, every metropolitan area, and all counties and places with populations of 20,000 or more. Although the ACS produces population, demographic and housing unit estimates,it is the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program that produces and disseminates the official estimates of the population for the nation, states, counties, cities and towns, and estimates of housing units for states and counties. For 2010 and other decennial census years, the Decennial Census provides the official counts of population and housing units.2011acs1cd113geographiesvariablesN/AN/Adocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2011/acs1/cd113
2011 American Community Survey: 5-Year EstimatesThe American Community Survey (ACS) is a nationwide survey designed to provide communities a fresh look at how they are changing. The ACS replaced the decennial census long form in 2010 and thereafter by collecting long form type information throughout the decade rather than only once every 10 years. Questionnaires are mailed to a sample of addresses to obtain information about households -- that is, about each person and the housing unit itself. The American Community Survey produces demographic, social, housing and economic estimates in the form of 1-year, 3-year and 5-year estimates based on population thresholds. The strength of the ACS is in estimating population and housing characteristics. It produces estimates for small areas, including census tracts and population subgroups. Although the ACS produces population, demographic and housing unit estimates,it is the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program that produces and disseminates the official estimates of the population for the nation, states, counties, cities and towns, and estimates of housing units for states and counties. For 2010 and other decennial census years, the Decennial Census provides the official counts of population and housing units.2011acs5geographiesvariablestagsN/Adocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2011/acs5
2011 County Business Patterns: Business PatternsCounty Business Patterns (CBP) is an annual series that provides economic data by industry at the U.S., State, County and Metropolitan Area levels. This series includes the number of establishments, employment during the week of March 12, first quarter payroll, and annual payroll. CBP provides statistics for businesses with paid employees for the U.S., Puerto Rico, and the Island Areas.2011cbpgeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2011/cbp
2011 Nonemployer Statistics: Non Employer StatisticsNonemployer Statistics is an annual series that provides subnational economic data for businesses that have no paid employees and are subject to federal income tax. The data consist of the number of businesses and total receipts by industry. Most nonemployers are self-employed individuals operating unincorporated businesses (known as sole proprietorships), which may or may not be the owner's principal source of income. The majority of all business establishments in the United States are nonemployers, yet these firms average less than 4 percent of all sales and receipts nationally. Due to their small economic impact, these firms are excluded from most other Census Bureau business statistics (the primary exception being the Survey of Business Owners). The Nonemployers Statistics series is the primary resource available to study the scope and activities of nonemployers at a detailed geographic level. For complementary statistics on the firms that do have paid employees, refer to the County Business Patterns. Additional sources of data on small businesses include the Economic Census, and the Statistics of U.S. Businesses.2011nonempgeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2011/nonemp
2012 American Community Survey: 1-Year EstimatesThe American Community Survey (ACS) is a nationwide survey designed to provide communities a fresh look at how they are changing. The ACS replaced the decennial census long form in 2010 and thereafter by collecting long form type information throughout the decade rather than only once every 10 years. Questionnaires are mailed to a sample of addresses to obtain information about households -- that is, about each person and the housing unit itself. The American Community Survey produces demographic, social, housing and economic estimates in the form of 1-year, 3-year and 5-year estimates based on population thresholds. The strength of the ACS is in estimating population and housing characteristics. It produces estimates for small areas, including census tracts and population subgroups. Although the ACS produces population, demographic and housing unit estimates,it is the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program that produces and disseminates the official estimates of the population for the nation, states, counties, cities and towns, and estimates of housing units for states and counties. For 2010 and other decennial census years, the Decennial Census provides the official counts of population and housing units.2012acs1geographiesvariablestagsN/Adocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2012/acs1
2012 American Community Survey: 1-Year Profile TablesThe American Community Survey (ACS) is a nationwide survey designed to provide communities a fresh look at how they are changing. The ACS replaced the decennial census long form in 2010 and thereafter by collecting long form type information throughout the decade rather than only once every 10 years. Questionnaires are mailed to a sample of addresses to obtain information about households -- that is, about each person and the housing unit itself. The American Community Survey produces demographic, social, housing and economic estimates in the form of 1-year, 3-year and 5-year estimates based on population thresholds. The strength of the ACS is in estimating population and housing characteristics. It produces estimates for small areas, including census tracts and population subgroups. Although the ACS produces population, demographic and housing unit estimates,it is the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program that produces and disseminates the official estimates of the population for the nation, states, counties, cities and towns, and estimates of housing units for states and counties. For 2010 and other decennial census years, the Decennial Census provides the official counts of population and housing units.2012acs1profilegeographiesvariablesN/AN/Adocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2012/acs1/profile
2012 American Community Survey: 3-Year EstimatesThe American Community Survey (ACS) is a nationwide survey designed to provide communities a fresh look at how they are changing. The ACS replaced the decennial census long form in 2010 and thereafter by collecting long form type information throughout the decade rather than only once every 10 years. Questionnaires are mailed to a sample of addresses to obtain information about households -- that is, about each person and the housing unit itself. The American Community Survey produces demographic, social, housing and economic estimates in the form of 1-year, 3-year and 5-year estimates based on population thresholds. The strength of the ACS is in estimating population and housing characteristics. It produces estimates for small areas, including census tracts and population subgroups. Although the ACS produces population, demographic and housing unit estimates,it is the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program that produces and disseminates the official estimates of the population for the nation, states, counties, cities and towns, and estimates of housing units for states and counties. For 2010 and other decennial census years, the Decennial Census provides the official counts of population and housing units.2012acs3geographiesvariablestagsN/Adocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2012/acs3
2012 American Community Survey: 3-Year Profile TablesThe American Community Survey (ACS) is a nationwide survey designed to provide communities a fresh look at how they are changing. The ACS replaced the decennial census long form in 2010 and thereafter by collecting long form type information throughout the decade rather than only once every 10 years. Questionnaires are mailed to a sample of addresses to obtain information about households -- that is, about each person and the housing unit itself. The American Community Survey produces demographic, social, housing and economic estimates in the form of 1-year, 3-year and 5-year estimates based on population thresholds. The strength of the ACS is in estimating population and housing characteristics. It produces estimates for small areas, including census tracts and population subgroups. Although the ACS produces population, demographic and housing unit estimates,it is the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program that produces and disseminates the official estimates of the population for the nation, states, counties, cities and towns, and estimates of housing units for states and counties. For 2010 and other decennial census years, the Decennial Census provides the official counts of population and housing units.2012acs3profilegeographiesvariablesN/AN/Adocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2012/acs3/profile
2008-2012 American Community Survey - Summarized Data: 5-Year Summary FileThe American Community Survey (ACS) is a nationwide survey designed to provide communities a fresh look at how they are changing. The ACS replaced the decennial census long form in 2010 and thereafter by collecting long form type information throughout the decade rather than only once every 10 years. Questionnaires are mailed to a sample of addresses to obtain information about households -- that is, about each person and the housing unit itself. The American Community Survey produces demographic, social, housing and economic estimates in the form of 1-year, 3-year and 5-year estimates based on population thresholds. The strength of the ACS is in estimating population and housing characteristics. It produces estimates for small areas, including census tracts and population subgroups. Although the ACS produces population, demographic and housing unit estimates,it is the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program that produces and disseminates the official estimates of the population for the nation, states, counties, cities and towns, and estimates of housing units for states and counties. For 2010 and other decennial census years, the Decennial Census provides the official counts of population and housing units.2012acs5geographiesvariablestagsexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2012/acs5
2012 American Community Survey: 5-Year Profile TablesThe American Community Survey (ACS) is a nationwide survey designed to provide communities a fresh look at how they are changing. The ACS replaced the decennial census long form in 2010 and thereafter by collecting long form type information throughout the decade rather than only once every 10 years. Questionnaires are mailed to a sample of addresses to obtain information about households -- that is, about each person and the housing unit itself. The American Community Survey produces demographic, social, housing and economic estimates in the form of 1-year, 3-year and 5-year estimates based on population thresholds. The strength of the ACS is in estimating population and housing characteristics. It produces estimates for small areas, including census tracts and population subgroups. Although the ACS produces population, demographic and housing unit estimates,it is the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program that produces and disseminates the official estimates of the population for the nation, states, counties, cities and towns, and estimates of housing units for states and counties. For 2010 and other decennial census years, the Decennial Census provides the official counts of population and housing units.2012acs5profilegeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2012/acs5/profile
2012 County Business Patterns: Business PatternsCounty Business Patterns (CBP) is an annual series that provides economic data by industry at the U.S., State, County and Metropolitan Area levels. This series includes the number of establishments, employment during the week of March 12, first quarter payroll, and annual payroll. CBP provides statistics for businesses with paid employees for the U.S., Puerto Rico, and the Island Areas.2012cbpgeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2012/cbp
2012 Economic Census - All Sectors: Economy-Wide Key StatisticsThe Economic Census is the U.S. Government's official five-year measure of American business and the economy. It is conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau, and response is required by law. In October through December 2012, forms were sent out to nearly 4 million businesses, including large, medium and small companies representing all U.S. locations and industries. Respondents were asked to provide a range of operational and performance data for their companies.2012ewksgeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2012/ewks
2012 Nonemployer Statistics: Non Employer StatisticsNonemployer Statistics is an annual series that provides subnational economic data for businesses that have no paid employees and are subject to federal income tax. The data consist of the number of businesses and total receipts by industry. Most nonemployers are self-employed individuals operating unincorporated businesses (known as sole proprietorships), which may or may not be the owner's principal source of income. The majority of all business establishments in the United States are nonemployers, yet these firms average less than 4 percent of all sales and receipts nationally. Due to their small economic impact, these firms are excluded from most other Census Bureau business statistics (the primary exception being the Survey of Business Owners). The Nonemployers Statistics series is the primary resource available to study the scope and activities of nonemployers at a detailed geographic level. For complementary statistics on the firms that do have paid employees, refer to the County Business Patterns. Additional sources of data on small businesses include the Economic Census, and the Statistics of U.S. Businesses.2012nonempgeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2012/nonemp
Vintage 2012 Population Projections - : Projected BirthsProjected Births by Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin for the United States: 2012 to 2060 File: 2012 National Population Projections Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division Release Date: December 2012 NOTE: Hispanic origin is considered an ethnicity, not a race. Hispanics may be of any race. The projections generally do not precisely agree with population estimates available elsewhere on the Census Bureau website for methodological reasons. Where both estimates and projections are available for a given time reference, we recommend that you use the population estimates as the measure of the current population. For detailed information about the methods used to create the population projections, see http://www.census.gov/population/projections/methodology/. *** The U.S. Census Bureau periodically produces projections of the United States resident population by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Population projections are estimates of the population for future dates. They are typically based on an estimated population consistent with the most recent decennial census and are produced using the cohort-component method. Projections illustrate possible courses of population change based on assumptions about future births, deaths, net international migration, and domestic migration. In some cases, several series of projections are produced based on alternative assumptions for future fertility, life expectancy, net international migration, and (for state-level projections) state-to-state or domestic migration. Additional information is available on the Population Projections website: http://www.census.gov/population/projections/.2012popprojbirthsgeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2012/popproj/births
Vintage 2012 Population Projections: Projected DeathsProjected Deaths by Single Year of Age, Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin for the United States: 2012 to 2060 File: 2012 National Population Projections Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division Release Date: December 2012 NOTE: Hispanic origin is considered an ethnicity, not a race. Hispanics may be of any race. The projections generally do not precisely agree with population estimates available elsewhere on the Census Bureau website for methodological reasons. Where both estimates and projections are available for a given time reference, we recommend that you use the population estimates as the measure of the current population. For detailed information about the methods used to create the population projections, see http://www.census.gov/population/projections/methodology/. *** The U.S. Census Bureau periodically produces projections of the United States resident population by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Population projections are estimates of the population for future dates. They are typically based on an estimated population consistent with the most recent decennial census and are produced using the cohort-component method. Projections illustrate possible courses of population change based on assumptions about future births, deaths, net international migration, and domestic migration. In some cases, several series of projections are produced based on alternative assumptions for future fertility, life expectancy, net international migration, and (for state-level projections) state-to-state or domestic migration. Additional information is available on the Population Projections website: http://www.census.gov/population/projections/.2012popprojdeathsgeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2012/popproj/deaths
Vintage 2012 Population Projections: Projected Net International Migration by Single Year of ageProjected Net International Migration by Single Year of Age, Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin for the United States: 2012 to 2060 File: 2012 National Population Projections Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division Release Date: December 2012 NOTE: Hispanic origin is considered an ethnicity, not a race. Hispanics may be of any race. The projections generally do not precisely agree with population estimates available elsewhere on the Census Bureau website for methodological reasons. Where both estimates and projections are available for a given time reference, we recommend that you use the population estimates as the measure of the current population. For detailed information about the methods used to create the population projections, see http://www.census.gov/population/projections/methodology/. *** The U.S. Census Bureau periodically produces projections of the United States resident population by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Population projections are estimates of the population for future dates. They are typically based on an estimated population consistent with the most recent decennial census and are produced using the cohort-component method. Projections illustrate possible courses of population change based on assumptions about future births, deaths, net international migration, and domestic migration. In some cases, several series of projections are produced based on alternative assumptions for future fertility, life expectancy, net international migration, and (for state-level projections) state-to-state or domestic migration. Additional information is available on the Population Projections website: http://www.census.gov/population/projections/.2012popprojnimgeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2012/popproj/nim
Vintage 2012 Population Projections: Projected Population by Single Year of AgeProjected Population by Single Year of Age, Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin for the United States: 2012 to 2060 File: 2012 National Population Projections Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division Release Date: December 2012 NOTE: Hispanic origin is considered an ethnicity, not a race. Hispanics may be of any race. The projections generally do not precisely agree with population estimates available elsewhere on the Census Bureau website for methodological reasons. Where both estimates and projections are available for a given time reference, we recommend that you use the population estimates as the measure of the current population. For detailed information about the methods used to create the population projections, see http://www.census.gov/population/projections/methodology/. *** The U.S. Census Bureau periodically produces projections of the United States resident population by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Population projections are estimates of the population for future dates. They are typically based on an estimated population consistent with the most recent decennial census and are produced using the cohort-component method. Projections illustrate possible courses of population change based on assumptions about future births, deaths, net international migration, and domestic migration. In some cases, several series of projections are produced based on alternative assumptions for future fertility, life expectancy, net international migration, and (for state-level projections) state-to-state or domestic migration. Additional information is available on the Population Projections website: http://www.census.gov/population/projections/.2012popprojpopgeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2012/popproj/pop
2012 Public Elementary-Secondary Education Finance: Individual Unit TablesThe survey covers all public school systems that provide elementary or secondary education (PK-12). The data include revenue by source (local property tax, monies from other school systems, private tuition and transportation payments, school lunch charges, direct state aid, and federal aid passed through the state government), expenditure by function and object (instruction, support service functions, salaries, and capital outlay), indebtedness, and cash and investments.2012pubschlfingeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2012/pubschlfin
2013 American Community Survey - Summarized Data: 1-Year Summary FileThe American Community Survey (ACS) is a nationwide survey designed to provide communities a fresh look at how they are changing. The ACS replaced the decennial census long form in 2010 and thereafter by collecting long form type information throughout the decade rather than only once every 10 years. Questionnaires are mailed to a sample of addresses to obtain information about households -- that is, about each person and the housing unit itself. The American Community Survey produces demographic, social, housing and economic estimates in the form of 1-year, 3-year and 5-year estimates based on population thresholds. The strength of the ACS is in estimating population and housing characteristics. The 2012 data provide key estimates for each of the topic areas covered by the ACS for the nation, all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, every congressional district, every metropolitan area, and all counties and places with populations of 65,000 or more. Although the ACS produces population, demographic and housing unit estimates,it is the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program that produces and disseminates the official estimates of the population for the nation, states, counties, cities and towns, and estimates of housing units for states and counties. For 2010 and other decennial census years, the Decennial Census provides the official counts of population and housing units.2013acs1geographiesvariablestagsexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2013/acs1
2013 American Community Survey - Data Profiles: 1-Year Data ProfileThe American Community Survey (ACS) is a nationwide survey designed to provide communities a fresh look at how they are changing. The ACS replaced the decennial census long form in 2010 and thereafter by collecting long form type information throughout the decade rather than only once every 10 years. Questionnaires are mailed to a sample of addresses to obtain information about households -- that is, about each person and the housing unit itself. The American Community Survey produces demographic, social, housing and economic estimates in the form of 1-year, 3-year and 5-year estimates based on population thresholds. The strength of the ACS is in estimating population and housing characteristics. The 2012 data profiles provide key estimates for each of the topic areas covered by the ACS for the nation, all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, every congressional district, every metropolitan area, and all counties and places with populations of 65,000 or more. Although the ACS produces population, demographic and housing unit estimates,it is the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program that produces and disseminates the official estimates of the population for the nation, states, counties, cities and towns, and estimates of housing units for states and counties. For 2010 and other decennial census years, the Decennial Census provides the official counts of population and housing units.2013acs1profilegeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2013/acs1/profile
2011-2013 American Community Survey - Summarized Data: 3-Year Summary FileThe American Community Survey (ACS) is a nationwide survey designed to provide communities a fresh look at how they are changing. The ACS replaced the decennial census long form in 2010 and thereafter by collecting long form type information throughout the decade rather than only once every 10 years. Questionnaires are mailed to a sample of addresses to obtain information about households -- that is, about each person and the housing unit itself. The American Community Survey produces demographic, social, housing and economic estimates in the form of 1-year, 3-year and 5-year estimates based on population thresholds. The strength of the ACS is in estimating population and housing characteristics. The 3-year data provide key estimates for each of the topic areas covered by the ACS for the nation, all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, every congressional district, every metropolitan area, and all counties and places with populations of 20,000 or more. Although the ACS produces population, demographic and housing unit estimates,it is the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program that produces and disseminates the official estimates of the population for the nation, states, counties, cities and towns, and estimates of housing units for states and counties. For 2010 and other decennial census years, the Decennial Census provides the official counts of population and housing units.2013acs3geographiesvariablestagsexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2013/acs3
2011-2013 American Community Survey - Data Profiles: 3-Year Data ProfileThe American Community Survey (ACS) is a nationwide survey designed to provide communities a fresh look at how they are changing. The ACS replaced the decennial census long form in 2010 and thereafter by collecting long form type information throughout the decade rather than only once every 10 years. Questionnaires are mailed to a sample of addresses to obtain information about households -- that is, about each person and the housing unit itself. The American Community Survey produces demographic, social, housing and economic estimates in the form of 1-year, 3-year and 5-year estimates based on population thresholds. The strength of the ACS is in estimating population and housing characteristics. The 3-year data provide key estimates for each of the topic areas covered by the ACS for the nation, all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, every congressional district, every metropolitan area, and all counties and places with populations of 20,000 or more. Although the ACS produces population, demographic and housing unit estimates,it is the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program that produces and disseminates the official estimates of the population for the nation, states, counties, cities and towns, and estimates of housing units for states and counties. For 2010 and other decennial census years, the Decennial Census provides the official counts of population and housing units.2013acs3profilegeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2013/acs3/profile
2009-2013 American Community Survey 5-Year EstimatesThe American Community Survey (ACS) is a nationwide survey designed to provide communities a fresh look at how they are changing. The ACS replaced the decennial census long form in 2010 and thereafter by collecting long form type information throughout the decade rather than only once every 10 years. Questionnaires are mailed to a sample of addresses to obtain information about households -- that is, about each person and the housing unit itself. The American Community Survey produces demographic, social, housing and economic estimates in the form of 1-year, 3-year and 5-year estimates based on population thresholds. The strength of the ACS is in estimating population and housing characteristics. It produces estimates for small areas, including census tracts and population subgroups. Although the ACS produces population, demographic and housing unit estimates,it is the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program that produces and disseminates the official estimates of the population for the nation, states, counties, cities and towns, and estimates of housing units for states and counties. For 2010 and other decennial census years, the Decennial Census provides the official counts of population and housing units.2013acs5geographiesvariablestagsexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2013/acs5
2009-2013 American Community Survey 5-Year ProfilesThe American Community Survey (ACS) is a nationwide survey designed to provide communities a fresh look at how they are changing. The ACS replaced the decennial census long form in 2010 and thereafter by collecting long form type information throughout the decade rather than only once every 10 years. Questionnaires are mailed to a sample of addresses to obtain information about households -- that is, about each person and the housing unit itself. The American Community Survey produces demographic, social, housing and economic estimates in the form of 1-year, 3-year and 5-year estimates based on population thresholds. The strength of the ACS is in estimating population and housing characteristics. It produces estimates for small areas, including census tracts and population subgroups. Although the ACS produces population, demographic and housing unit estimates,it is the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program that produces and disseminates the official estimates of the population for the nation, states, counties, cities and towns, and estimates of housing units for states and counties. For 2010 and other decennial census years, the Decennial Census provides the official counts of population and housing units.2013acs5profilegeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2013/acs5/profile
2013 County Business Patterns: Business PatternsCounty Business Patterns (CBP) is an annual series that provides economic data by industry at the U.S., State, County and Metropolitan Area levels. This series includes the number of establishments, employment during the week of March 12, first quarter payroll, and annual payroll. CBP provides statistics for businesses with paid employees for the U.S., Puerto Rico, and the Island Areas.2013cbpgeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2013/cbp
2013 Nonemployer Statistics: Non Employer StatisticsNonemployer Statistics is an annual series that provides subnational economic data for businesses that have no paid employees and are subject to federal income tax. The data consist of the number of businesses and total receipts by industry. Most nonemployers are self-employed individuals operating unincorporated businesses (known as sole proprietorships), which may or may not be the owner's principal source of income. The majority of all business establishments in the United States are nonemployers, yet these firms average less than 4 percent of all sales and receipts nationally. Due to their small economic impact, these firms are excluded from most other Census Bureau business statistics (the primary exception being the Survey of Business Owners). The Nonemployers Statistics series is the primary resource available to study the scope and activities of nonemployers at a detailed geographic level. For complementary statistics on the firms that do have paid employees, refer to the County Business Patterns. Additional sources of data on small businesses include the Economic Census, and the Statistics of U.S. Businesses.2013nonempgeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2013/nonemp
Vintage 2013 Population Estimates: County Population Estimates by 5 Year Age Groups, Sex, 5 Races, and Hispanic OriginAnnual County Resident Population Estimates for 5 Race Groups (5 Race Alone or in Combination Groups) by Five-Year Age Groups, Sex, and Hispanic Origin: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 // File: 7/1/2013 County Characteristics Resident Population Estimates // Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division // Release Date: June 2014 // Note: 'In combination' means in combination with one or more other races. The sum of the five race groups adds to more than the total population because individuals may report more than one race. The estimates are based on the 2010 Census and reflect changes to the April 1, 2010 population due to the Count Question Resolution program and geographic program revisions. Hispanic origin is considered an ethnicity, not a race. Hispanics may be of any race. Responses of 'Some Other Race' from the 2010 Census are modified. This results in differences between the population for specific race categories shown for the 2010 Census population in this file versus those in the original 2010 Census data. For more information, see http://www.census.gov/popest/data/historical/files/MRSF-01-US1.pdf. // For detailed information about the methods used to create the population estimates, see http://www.census.gov/popest/methodology/index.html. // Each year, the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program (PEP) utilizes current data on births, deaths, and migration to calculate population change since the most recent decennial census, and produces a time series of estimates of population. The annual time series of estimates begins with the most recent decennial census data and extends to the vintage year. The vintage year (e.g., V2013) refers to the final year of the time series. The reference date for all estimates is July 1, unless otherwise specified. With each new issue of estimates, the Census Bureau revises estimates for years back to the last census. As each vintage of estimates includes all years since the most recent decennial census, the latest vintage of data available supersedes all previously produced estimates for those dates. The Population Estimates Program provides additional information including historical and intercensal estimates, evaluation estimates, demographic analysis, and research papers on its website: http://www.census.gov/popest/index.html.2013pepcochar5geographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2013/pep/cochar5
Vintage 2013 Population Estimates: County Population Estimates by 5 Year Age Groups, Sex, 6 Races, and Hispanic OriginAnnual County Resident Population Estimates for 6 Race Groups (5 Race Alone Groups and Two or More Races) by Five-Year Age Groups, Sex, and Hispanic Origin: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 // File: 7/1/2013 County Characteristics Resident Population Estimates // Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division // Release Date: June 2014 // Note: The estimates are based on the 2010 Census and reflect changes to the April 1, 2010 population due to the Count Question Resolution program and geographic program revisions. Hispanic origin is considered an ethnicity, not a race. Hispanics may be of any race. Responses of 'Some Other Race' from the 2010 Census are modified. This results in differences between the population for specific race categories shown for the 2010 Census population in this file versus those in the original 2010 Census data. For more information, see http://www.census.gov/popest/data/historical/files/MRSF-01-US1.pdf. // For detailed information about the methods used to create the population estimates, see http://www.census.gov/popest/methodology/index.html. // Each year, the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program (PEP) utilizes current data on births, deaths, and migration to calculate population change since the most recent decennial census, and produces a time series of estimates of population. The annual time series of estimates begins with the most recent decennial census data and extends to the vintage year. The vintage year (e.g., V2013) refers to the final year of the time series. The reference date for all estimates is July 1, unless otherwise specified. With each new issue of estimates, the Census Bureau revises estimates for years back to the last census. As each vintage of estimates includes all years since the most recent decennial census, the latest vintage of data available supersedes all previously produced estimates for those dates. The Population Estimates Program provides additional information including historical and intercensal estimates, evaluation estimates, demographic analysis, and research papers on its website: http://www.census.gov/popest/index.html.2013pepcochar6geographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2013/pep/cochar6
Vintage 2013 Population Estimates: County Total Population and Components of ChangeAnnual Resident Population Estimates, Estimated Components of Resident Population Change, and Rates of the Components of Resident Population Change for States and Counties // Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division // Note: Total population change includes a residual. This residual represents the change in population that cannot be attributed to any specific demographic component. See Population Estimates Terms and Definitions at http://www.census.gov/popest/about/terms.html. // Net international migration in the United States includes the international migration of both native and foreign-born populations. Specifically, it includes: (a) the net international migration of the foreign born, (b) the net migration between the United States and Puerto Rico, (c) the net migration of natives to and from the United States, and (d) the net movement of the Armed Forces population between the United States and overseas. // The estimates are based on the 2010 Census and reflect changes to the April 1, 2010 population due to the Count Question Resolution program and geographic program revisions. See Geographic Terms and Definitions at http://www.census.gov/popest/about/geo/terms.html for a list of the states that are included in each region and division. // For detailed information about the methods used to create the population estimates, see http://www.census.gov/popest/methodology/index.html. // Each year, the Census Bureaus Population Estimates Program (PEP) utilizes current data on births, deaths, and migration to calculate population change since the most recent decennial census, and produces a time series of estimates of population. The annual time series of estimates begins with the most recent decennial census data and extends to the vintage year. The vintage year (e.g., V2014) refers to the final year of the time series. The reference date for all estimates is July 1, unless otherwise specified. With each new issue of estimates, the Census Bureau revises estimates for years back to the last census. As each vintage of estimates includes all years since the most recent decennial census, the latest vintage of data available supersedes all previously produced estimates for those dates. The Population Estimates Program provides additional information including historical and intercensal estimates, evaluation estimates, demographic analysis, and research papers on its website: http://www.census.gov/popest/index.html.2013pepctygeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2013/pep/cty
Vintage 2013 Population Estimates: Housing Unit Estimates for US, States, and CountiesAnnual Housing Unit Estimates for the United States, States, and Counties: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 // File: 7/1/2013 Housing Unit Estimates // Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division // Release Date: May 2014 // Note: The estimates are based on the 2010 Census and reflect changes to the April 1, 2010 housing units due to the Count Question Resolution program and geographic program revisions. The estimates are based on the 2010 Census and reflect changes to the April 1, 2010 housing units due to the Count Question Resolution program and geographic program revisions. All geographic boundaries for the 2013 housing unit estimates series are as of January 1, 2013. For the housing unit estimates methodology statement, see http://www.census.gov/popest/methodology/index.html. // Each year, the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program (PEP) utilizes current data on births, deaths, and migration to calculate population change since the most recent decennial census, and produces a time series of estimates of population. The annual time series of estimates begins with the most recent decennial census data and extends to the vintage year. The vintage year (e.g., V2013) refers to the final year of the time series. The reference date for all estimates is July 1, unless otherwise specified. With each new issue of estimates, the Census Bureau revises estimates for years back to the last census. As each vintage of estimates includes all years since the most recent decennial census, the latest vintage of data available supersedes all previously produced estimates for those dates. The Population Estimates Program provides additional information including historical and intercensal estimates, evaluation estimates, demographic analysis, and research papers on its website: http://www.census.gov/popest/index.html.2013pephousinggeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2013/pep/housing
Vintage 2013 Population Estimates: National Monthly Population Estimates by Single Year of Age , Sex, 5 Races, Hispanic Origin, and UniverseMonthly Population Estimates by Universe, Age, Sex, 5 Races, and Hispanic Origin for the United States: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 // File: 7/1/2013 National Population Estimates // Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division // Release Date: June 2014 // Note: 'In combination' means in combination with one or more other races. The sum of the five race groups adds to more than the total population because individuals may report more than one race. The estimates are based on the 2010 Census and reflect changes to the April 1, 2010 population due to the Count Question Resolution program and geographic program revisions. Hispanic origin is considered an ethnicity, not a race. Hispanics may be of any race. Responses of 'Some Other Race' from the 2010 Census are modified. This results in differences between the population for specific race categories shown for the 2010 Census population in this file versus those in the original 2010 Census data. For more information, see http://www.census.gov/popest/data/historical/files/MRSF-01-US1.pdf. // Persons on active duty in the Armed Forces were not enumerated in the 2010 Census. Therefore, variables for the 2010 Census civilian, civilian noninstitutionalized, and resident population plus Armed Forces overseas populations cannot be derived and are not available on these files. // For detailed information about the methods used to create the population estimates, see http://www.census.gov/popest/methodology/index.html. // Each year, the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program (PEP) utilizes current data on births, deaths, and migration to calculate population change since the most recent decennial census, and produces a time series of estimates of population. The annual time series of estimates begins with the most recent decennial census data and extends to the vintage year. The vintage year (e.g., V2013) refers to the final year of the time series. The reference date for all estimates is July 1, unless otherwise specified. With each new issue of estimates, the Census Bureau revises estimates for years back to the last census. As each vintage of estimates includes all years since the most recent decennial census, the latest vintage of data available supersedes all previously produced estimates for those dates. The Population Estimates Program provides additional information including historical and intercensal estimates, evaluation estimates, demographic analysis, and research papers on its website: http://www.census.gov/popest/index.html.2013pepmonthlynatchar5geographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2013/pep/monthlynatchar5
Vintage 2013 Population Estimates: National Monthly Population Estimates by Single Year of Age, Sex, 6 Races, Hispanic Origin, and UniverseMonthly Population Estimates by Universe, Age, Sex, 6 Races, and Hispanic Origin for the United States: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 // File: 7/1/2013 National Population Estimates // Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division // Release Date: June 2014 // Note: The estimates are based on the 2010 Census and reflect changes to the April 1, 2010 population due to the Count Question Resolution program and geographic program revisions. Hispanic origin is considered an ethnicity, not a race. Hispanics may be of any race. Responses of 'Some Other Race' from the 2010 Census are modified. This results in differences between the population for specific race categories shown for the 2010 Census population in this file versus those in the original 2010 Census data. For more information, see http://www.census.gov/popest/data/historical/files/MRSF-01-US1.pdf. // Persons on active duty in the Armed Forces were not enumerated in the 2010 Census. Therefore, variables for the 2010 Census civilian, civilian noninstitutionalized, and resident population plus Armed Forces overseas populations cannot be derived and are not available on these files. // For detailed information about the methods used to create the population estimates, see http://www.census.gov/popest/methodology/index.html. // Each year, the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program (PEP) utilizes current data on births, deaths, and migration to calculate population change since the most recent decennial census, and produces a time series of estimates of population. The annual time series of estimates begins with the most recent decennial census data and extends to the vintage year. The vintage year (e.g., V2013) refers to the final year of the time series. The reference date for all estimates is July 1, unless otherwise specified. With each new issue of estimates, the Census Bureau revises estimates for years back to the last census. As each vintage of estimates includes all years since the most recent decennial census, the latest vintage of data available supersedes all previously produced estimates for those dates. The Population Estimates Program provides additional information including historical and intercensal estimates, evaluation estimates, demographic analysis, and research papers on its website: http://www.census.gov/popest/index.html.2013pepmonthlynatchar6geographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2013/pep/monthlynatchar6
Vintage 2013 Population Estimates: US, State, and PR Total Population and Components of ChangeAnnual Population Estimates, Estimated Components of Resident Population Change, and Rates of the Components of Resident Population Change for the United States, States, and Puerto Rico // File: National and State Population Estimates // Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division // Note: Total population change includes a residual. This residual represents the change in population that cannot be attributed to any specific demographic component. See Population Estimates Terms and Definitions at http://www.census.gov/popest/about/terms.html. // Net international migration (except for Puerto Rico) includes the international migration of both native and foreign-born populations. Specifically, it includes: (a) the net international migration of the foreign born, (b) the net migration between the United States and Puerto Rico, (c) the net migration of natives to and from the United States, and (d) the net movement of the Armed Forces population between the United States and overseas. Net international migration for Puerto Rico includes the migration of native and foreign-born populations between the United States and Puerto Rico. // The estimates are based on the 2010 Census and reflect changes to the April 1, 2010 population due to the Count Question Resolution program and geographic program revisions. See Geographic Terms and Definitions at http://www.census.gov/popest/about/geo/terms.html for a list of the states that are included in each region and division. All geographic boundaries for these population estimates are as of January 1, 2013. // For detailed information about the methods used to create the population estimates, see http://www.census.gov/popest/methodology/index.html. // Each year, the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program (PEP) utilizes current data on births, deaths, and migration to calculate population change since the most recent decennial census, and produces a time series of estimates of population. The annual time series of estimates begins with the most recent decennial census data and extends to the vintage year. The vintage year (e.g., V2013) refers to the final year of the time series. The reference date for all estimates is July 1, unless otherwise specified. With each new issue of estimates, the Census Bureau revises estimates for years back to the last census. As each vintage of estimates includes all years since the most recent decennial census, the latest vintage of data available supersedes all previously produced estimates for those dates. The Population Estimates Program provides additional information including historical and intercensal estimates, evaluation estimates, demographic analysis, and research papers on its website: http://www.census.gov/popest/index.html.2013pepnatstprcgeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2013/pep/natstprc
Vintage 2013 Population Estimates: US, State, and PR Population Age 18+Annual Population Estimates, Estimated Components of Resident Population Change, and Rates of the Components of Resident Population Change for the United States, States, and Puerto Rico // Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division // Note: Total population change includes a residual. This residual represents the change in population that cannot be attributed to any specific demographic component. See Population Estimates Terms and Definitions at http://www.census.gov/popest/about/terms.html. // Net international migration (except for Puerto Rico) includes the international migration of both native and foreign-born populations. Specifically, it includes: (a) the net international migration of the foreign born, (b) the net migration between the United States and Puerto Rico, (c) the net migration of natives to and from the United States, and (d) the net movement of the Armed Forces population between the United States and overseas. Net international migration for Puerto Rico includes the migration of native and foreign-born populations between the United States and Puerto Rico. // The estimates are based on the 2010 Census and reflect changes to the April 1, 2010 population due to the Count Question Resolution program and geographic program revisions. See Geographic Terms and Definitions at http://www.census.gov/popest/about/geo/terms.html for a list of the states that are included in each region and division. // For detailed information about the methods used to create the population estimates, see http://www.census.gov/popest/methodology/index.html. // Each year, the Census Bureaus Population Estimates Program (PEP) utilizes current data on births, deaths, and migration to calculate population change since the most recent decennial census, and produces a time series of estimates of population. The annual time series of estimates begins with the most recent decennial census data and extends to the vintage year. The vintage year (e.g., V2014) refers to the final year of the time series. The reference date for all estimates is July 1, unless otherwise specified. With each new issue of estimates, the Census Bureau revises estimates for years back to the last census. As each vintage of estimates includes all years since the most recent decennial census, the latest vintage of data available supersedes all previously produced estimates for those dates. The Population Estimates Program provides additional information including historical and intercensal estimates, evaluation estimates, demographic analysis, and research papers on its website: http://www.census.gov/popest/index.html.2013pepnatstprc18geographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2013/pep/natstprc18
Vintage 2013 Population Estimates: Puerto Rico Commonwealth Estimates by Single Year of Age and SexAnnual Estimates of the Resident Population by Single Year of Age and Sex for Puerto Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 // File: 7/1/2013 Puerto Rico Commonwealth Population Estimates // Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division // Release Date: June 2014 // Note: The estimates are based on the 2010 Census and reflect changes to the April 1, 2010 population due to the Count Question Resolution program and geographic program revisions. // For detailed information about the methods used to create the population estimates, see http://www.census.gov/popest/methodology/index.html. // Each year, the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program (PEP) utilizes current data on births, deaths, and migration to calculate population change since the most recent decennial census, and produces a time series of estimates of population. The annual time series of estimates begins with the most recent decennial census data and extends to the vintage year. The vintage year (e.g., V2013) refers to the final year of the time series. The reference date for all estimates is July 1, unless otherwise specified. With each new issue of estimates, the Census Bureau revises estimates for years back to the last census. As each vintage of estimates includes all years since the most recent decennial census, the latest vintage of data available supersedes all previously produced estimates for those dates. The Population Estimates Program provides additional information including historical and intercensal estimates, evaluation estimates, demographic analysis, and research papers on its website: http://www.census.gov/popest/index.html.2013pepprcagesexgeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2013/pep/prcagesex
Vintage 2013 Population Estimates: Puerto Rico Municipios Total PopulationAnnual Resident Population Estimates for Puerto Rico Municipios // Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division // Note: The estimates are based on the 2010 Census and reflect changes to the April 1, 2010 population due to the Count Question Resolution program and geographic program revisions. For detailed information about the methods used to create the population estimates, see http://www.census.gov/popest/methodology/index.html. // Each year, the Census Bureaus Population Estimates Program (PEP) utilizes current data on births, deaths, and migration to calculate population change since the most recent decennial census, and produces a time series of estimates of population. The annual time series of estimates begins with the most recent decennial census data and extends to the vintage year. The vintage year (e.g., V2014) refers to the final year of the time series. The reference date for all estimates is July 1, unless otherwise specified. With each new issue of estimates, the Census Bureau revises estimates for years back to the last census. As each vintage of estimates includes all years since the most recent decennial census, the latest vintage of data available supersedes all previously produced estimates for those dates. The Population Estimates Program provides additional information including historical and intercensal estimates, evaluation estimates, demographic analysis, and research papers on its website: http://www.census.gov/popest/index.html.2013pepprmgeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2013/pep/prm
Vintage 2013 Population Estimates: Puerto Rico Municipios Estimates by 5-Year Age Groups and SexAnnual Estimates of the Resident Population by Five-Year Age Groups and Sex for the Municipios of Puerto Rico: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 // File: 7/1/2013 Puerto Rico Municipio Population Estimates // Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division // Release Date: June 2014 // Note: The estimates are based on the 2010 Census and reflect changes to the April 1, 2010 population due to the Count Question Resolution program and geographic program revisions. // For detailed information about the methods used to create the population estimates, see http://www.census.gov/popest/methodology/index.html. // Each year, the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program (PEP) utilizes current data on births, deaths, and migration to calculate population change since the most recent decennial census, and produces a time series of estimates of population. The annual time series of estimates begins with the most recent decennial census data and extends to the vintage year. The vintage year (e.g., V2013) refers to the final year of the time series. The reference date for all estimates is July 1, unless otherwise specified. With each new issue of estimates, the Census Bureau revises estimates for years back to the last census. As each vintage of estimates includes all years since the most recent decennial census, the latest vintage of data available supersedes all previously produced estimates for those dates. The Population Estimates Program provides additional information including historical and intercensal estimates, evaluation estimates, demographic analysis, and research papers on its website: http://www.census.gov/popest/index.html2013pepprmagesexgeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2013/pep/prmagesex
Vintage 2013 Population Estimates: State Population Estimates by Single Year of Age, Sex, 5 Races, and Hispanic OriginAnnual State Resident Population Estimates for 5 Race Groups (5 Race Alone or in Combination Groups) by Age, Sex, and Hispanic Origin: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013// File: 7/1/2013 State Characteristics Population Estimates // Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division // Release Date: June 2014 // Note: 'In combination' means in combination with one or more other races. The sum of the five race groups adds to more than the total population because individuals may report more than one race. The estimates are based on the 2010 Census and reflect changes to the April 1, 2010 population due to the Count Question Resolution program and geographic program revisions. Hispanic origin is considered an ethnicity, not a race. Hispanics may be of any race. Responses of 'Some Other Race' from the 2010 Census are modified. This results in differences between the population for specific race categories shown for the 2010 Census population in this file versus those in the original 2010 Census data. For more information, see http://www.census.gov/popest/data/historical/files/MRSF-01-US1.pdf. // For detailed information about the methods used to create the population estimates, see http://www.census.gov/popest/methodology/index.html. // Each year, the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program (PEP) utilizes current data on births, deaths, and migration to calculate population change since the most recent decennial census, and produces a time series of estimates of population. The annual time series of estimates begins with the most recent decennial census data and extends to the vintage year. The vintage year (e.g., V2013) refers to the final year of the time series. The reference date for all estimates is July 1, unless otherwise specified. With each new issue of estimates, the Census Bureau revises estimates for years back to the last census. As each vintage of estimates includes all years since the most recent decennial census, the latest vintage of data available supersedes all previously produced estimates for those dates. The Population Estimates Program provides additional information including historical and intercensal estimates, evaluation estimates, demographic analysis, and research papers on its website: http://www.census.gov/popest/index.html.2013pepstchar5geographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2013/pep/stchar5
Vintage 2013 Population Estimates: State Population Estimates by Single Year of Age, Sex, 6 Races, and Hispanic OriginAnnual State Resident Population Estimates for 6 Race Groups (5 Race Alone Groups and Two or More Races) by Age, Sex, and Hispanic Origin: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 // File: 7/1/2013 State Characteristics Population Estimates // Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division // Release Date: June 2014 // Note: The estimates are based on the 2010 Census and reflect changes to the April 1, 2010 population due to the Count Question Resolution program and geographic program revisions. Hispanic origin is considered an ethnicity, not a race. Hispanics may be of any race. Responses of 'Some Other Race' from the 2010 Census are modified. This results in differences between the population for specific race categories shown for the 2010 Census population in this file versus those in the original 2010 Census data. For more information, see http://www.census.gov/popest/data/historical/files/MRSF-01-US1.pdf. // For detailed information about the methods used to create the population estimates, see http://www.census.gov/popest/methodology/index.html. // Each year, the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program (PEP) utilizes current data on births, deaths, and migration to calculate population change since the most recent decennial census, and produces a time series of estimates of population. The annual time series of estimates begins with the most recent decennial census data and extends to the vintage year. The vintage year (e.g., V2013) refers to the final year of the time series. The reference date for all estimates is July 1, unless otherwise specified. With each new issue of estimates, the Census Bureau revises estimates for years back to the last census. As each vintage of estimates includes all years since the most recent decennial census, the latest vintage of data available supersedes all previously produced estimates for those dates. The Population Estimates Program provides additional information including historical and intercensal estimates, evaluation estimates, demographic analysis, and research papers on its website: http://www.census.gov/popest/index.html.2013pepstchar6geographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2013/pep/stchar6
Vintage 2013 Population Estimates: Subcounty Population Places and MCDsSubcounty Resident Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 // File: 7/1/2013 Subcounty Population Estimates // Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division // Release Date: May 2014 // Note: The estimates are based on the 2010 Census and reflect changes to the April 1, 2010 population due to the Count Question Resolution program and geographic program revisions. See Geographic Terms and Definitions at http://www.census.gov/popest/about/geo/terms.html for a list of the states that are included in each region and division. For functional status codes, see http://www.census.gov/geo/reference/codes/place.html. All geographic boundaries for these population estimates are as of January 1, 2013. An (X) in the 2010 Census field indicates a government that was formed or incorporated after the 2010 Census. See additional information on these areas in the Geographic Boundary Change Notes (http://www.census.gov/geo/reference/boundary-changes.html). For population estimates methodology statements, see http://www.census.gov/popest/methodology/index.html. // The estimates base populations for the unincorporated part of Gadsden County, FL and Rockwell City city, IA (located in Calhoun County) include different group quarters population than enumerated in the 2010 Census. After comparison with other Census Bureau data collection efforts, the Census Bureau determined that the 2010 Census enumeration of the group quarters population in these areas was incomplete. Although not eligible for the Count Question Resolution program, the Census Bureau concluded that including the additional group quarters population for these two areas into the population estimates base would provide more accurate estimates for each area. // Each year, the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program (PEP) utilizes current data on births, deaths, and migration to calculate population change since the most recent decennial census, and produces a time series of estimates of population. The annual time series of estimates begins with the most recent decennial census data and extends to the vintage year. The vintage year (e.g., V2013) refers to the final year of the time series. The reference date for all estimates is July 1, unless otherwise specified. With each new issue of estimates, the Census Bureau revises estimates for years back to the last census. As each vintage of estimates includes all years since the most recent decennial census, the latest vintage of data available supersedes all previously produced estimates for those dates. The Population Estimates Program provides additional information including historical and intercensal estimates, evaluation estimates, demographic analysis, and research papers on its website: http://www.census.gov/popest/index.html.2013pepsubctygeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2013/pep/subcty
Vintage 2014 Population Estimates: County Total Population and Components of ChangeAnnual Resident Population Estimates, Estimated Components of Resident Population Change, and Rates of the Components of Resident Population Change for States and Counties // Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division // Note: Total population change includes a residual. This residual represents the change in population that cannot be attributed to any specific demographic component. See Population Estimates Terms and Definitions at http://www.census.gov/popest/about/terms.html. // Net international migration in the United States includes the international migration of both native and foreign-born populations. Specifically, it includes: (a) the net international migration of the foreign born, (b) the net migration between the United States and Puerto Rico, (c) the net migration of natives to and from the United States, and (d) the net movement of the Armed Forces population between the United States and overseas. // The estimates are based on the 2010 Census and reflect changes to the April 1, 2010 population due to the Count Question Resolution program and geographic program revisions. See Geographic Terms and Definitions at http://www.census.gov/popest/about/geo/terms.html for a list of the states that are included in each region and division. // For detailed information about the methods used to create the population estimates, see http://www.census.gov/popest/methodology/index.html. // Each year, the Census Bureaus Population Estimates Program (PEP) utilizes current data on births, deaths, and migration to calculate population change since the most recent decennial census, and produces a time series of estimates of population. The annual time series of estimates begins with the most recent decennial census data and extends to the vintage year. The vintage year (e.g., V2014) refers to the final year of the time series. The reference date for all estimates is July 1, unless otherwise specified. With each new issue of estimates, the Census Bureau revises estimates for years back to the last census. As each vintage of estimates includes all years since the most recent decennial census, the latest vintage of data available supersedes all previously produced estimates for those dates. The Population Estimates Program provides additional information including historical and intercensal estimates, evaluation estimates, demographic analysis, and research papers on its website: http://www.census.gov/popest/index.html.2014pepctygeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2014/pep/cty
Vintage 2014 Population Estimates: Housing Unit Estimates for US, States, and CountiesAnnual Housing Unit Estimates for the United States, States, and Counties: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 // File: 7/1/2013 Housing Unit Estimates // Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division // Release Date: May 2014 // Note: The estimates are based on the 2010 Census and reflect changes to the April 1, 2010 housing units due to the Count Question Resolution program and geographic program revisions. The estimates are based on the 2010 Census and reflect changes to the April 1, 2010 housing units due to the Count Question Resolution program and geographic program revisions. All geographic boundaries for the 2013 housing unit estimates series are as of January 1, 2013. For the housing unit estimates methodology statement, see http://www.census.gov/popest/methodology/index.html. // Each year, the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program (PEP) utilizes current data on births, deaths, and migration to calculate population change since the most recent decennial census, and produces a time series of estimates of population. The annual time series of estimates begins with the most recent decennial census data and extends to the vintage year. The vintage year (e.g., V2013) refers to the final year of the time series. The reference date for all estimates is July 1, unless otherwise specified. With each new issue of estimates, the Census Bureau revises estimates for years back to the last census. As each vintage of estimates includes all years since the most recent decennial census, the latest vintage of data available supersedes all previously produced estimates for those dates. The Population Estimates Program provides additional information including historical and intercensal estimates, evaluation estimates, demographic analysis, and research papers on its website: http://www.census.gov/popest/index.html.2014pephousinggeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2014/pep/housing
Vintage 2014 Population Estimates: US, State, and PR Total Population and Components of ChangeAnnual Population Estimates, Estimated Components of Resident Population Change, and Rates of the Components of Resident Population Change for the United States, States, and Puerto Rico // File: National and State Population Estimates // Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division // Note: Total population change includes a residual. This residual represents the change in population that cannot be attributed to any specific demographic component. See Population Estimates Terms and Definitions at http://www.census.gov/popest/about/terms.html. // Net international migration (except for Puerto Rico) includes the international migration of both native and foreign-born populations. Specifically, it includes: (a) the net international migration of the foreign born, (b) the net migration between the United States and Puerto Rico, (c) the net migration of natives to and from the United States, and (d) the net movement of the Armed Forces population between the United States and overseas. Net international migration for Puerto Rico includes the migration of native and foreign-born populations between the United States and Puerto Rico. // The estimates are based on the 2010 Census and reflect changes to the April 1, 2010 population due to the Count Question Resolution program and geographic program revisions. See Geographic Terms and Definitions at http://www.census.gov/popest/about/geo/terms.html for a list of the states that are included in each region and division. All geographic boundaries for these population estimates are as of January 1, 2013. // For detailed information about the methods used to create the population estimates, see http://www.census.gov/popest/methodology/index.html. // Each year, the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program (PEP) utilizes current data on births, deaths, and migration to calculate population change since the most recent decennial census, and produces a time series of estimates of population. The annual time series of estimates begins with the most recent decennial census data and extends to the vintage year. The vintage year (e.g., V2013) refers to the final year of the time series. The reference date for all estimates is July 1, unless otherwise specified. With each new issue of estimates, the Census Bureau revises estimates for years back to the last census. As each vintage of estimates includes all years since the most recent decennial census, the latest vintage of data available supersedes all previously produced estimates for those dates. The Population Estimates Program provides additional information including historical and intercensal estimates, evaluation estimates, demographic analysis, and research papers on its website: http://www.census.gov/popest/index.html.2014pepnatstprcgeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2014/pep/natstprc
Vintage 2014 Population Estimates: US, State, and PR Population Age 18+Estimates of the Total Resident Population and Resident Population Age 18 Years and Older for the United States, States, and Puerto Rico // File: State Characteristics Population Estimates // Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division // Note: The estimates are based on the 2010 Census and reflect changes to the April 1, 2010 population due to the Count Question Resolution program and geographic program revisions. See Geographic Terms and Definitions at http://www.census.gov/popest/about/geo/terms.html for a list of the states that are included in each region and division. All geographic boundaries for these population estimates are as of January 1, 2013. // For detailed information about the methods used to create the population estimates, see http://www.census.gov/popest/methodology/index.html. // Each year, the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program (PEP) utilizes current data on births, deaths, and migration to calculate population change since the most recent decennial census, and produces a time series of estimates of population. The annual time series of estimates begins with the most recent decennial census data and extends to the vintage year. The vintage year (e.g., V2013) refers to the final year of the time series. The reference date for all estimates is July 1, unless otherwise specified. With each new issue of estimates, the Census Bureau revises estimates for years back to the last census. As each vintage of estimates includes all years since the most recent decennial census, the latest vintage of data available supersedes all previously produced estimates for those dates. The Population Estimates Program provides additional information including historical and intercensal estimates, evaluation estimates, demographic analysis, and research papers on its website: http://www.census.gov/popest/index.html.2014pepnatstprc18geographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2014/pep/natstprc18
Vintage 2014 Population Estimates: Puerto Rico Municipios Total PopulationAnnual Resident Population Estimates for Puerto Rico Municipios // Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division // Note: The estimates are based on the 2010 Census and reflect changes to the April 1, 2010 population due to the Count Question Resolution program and geographic program revisions. For detailed information about the methods used to create the population estimates, see http://www.census.gov/popest/methodology/index.html. // Each year, the Census Bureaus Population Estimates Program (PEP) utilizes current data on births, deaths, and migration to calculate population change since the most recent decennial census, and produces a time series of estimates of population. The annual time series of estimates begins with the most recent decennial census data and extends to the vintage year. The vintage year (e.g., V2014) refers to the final year of the time series. The reference date for all estimates is July 1, unless otherwise specified. With each new issue of estimates, the Census Bureau revises estimates for years back to the last census. As each vintage of estimates includes all years since the most recent decennial census, the latest vintage of data available supersedes all previously produced estimates for those dates. The Population Estimates Program provides additional information including historical and intercensal estimates, evaluation estimates, demographic analysis, and research papers on its website: http://www.census.gov/popest/index.html.2014pepprmgeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2014/pep/prm
Vintage 2014 Population Estimates: Subcounty Population Places and MCDsSubcounty Resident Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 // File: 7/1/2013 Subcounty Population Estimates // Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division // Release Date: May 2014 // Note: The estimates are based on the 2010 Census and reflect changes to the April 1, 2010 population due to the Count Question Resolution program and geographic program revisions. See Geographic Terms and Definitions at http://www.census.gov/popest/about/geo/terms.html for a list of the states that are included in each region and division. For functional status codes, see http://www.census.gov/geo/reference/codes/place.html. All geographic boundaries for these population estimates are as of January 1, 2013. An (X) in the 2010 Census field indicates a government that was formed or incorporated after the 2010 Census. See additional information on these areas in the Geographic Boundary Change Notes (http://www.census.gov/geo/reference/boundary-changes.html). For population estimates methodology statements, see http://www.census.gov/popest/methodology/index.html. // The estimates base populations for the unincorporated part of Gadsden County, FL and Rockwell City city, IA (located in Calhoun County) include different group quarters population than enumerated in the 2010 Census. After comparison with other Census Bureau data collection efforts, the Census Bureau determined that the 2010 Census enumeration of the group quarters population in these areas was incomplete. Although not eligible for the Count Question Resolution program, the Census Bureau concluded that including the additional group quarters population for these two areas into the population estimates base would provide more accurate estimates for each area. // Each year, the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program (PEP) utilizes current data on births, deaths, and migration to calculate population change since the most recent decennial census, and produces a time series of estimates of population. The annual time series of estimates begins with the most recent decennial census data and extends to the vintage year. The vintage year (e.g., V2013) refers to the final year of the time series. The reference date for all estimates is July 1, unless otherwise specified. With each new issue of estimates, the Census Bureau revises estimates for years back to the last census. As each vintage of estimates includes all years since the most recent decennial census, the latest vintage of data available supersedes all previously produced estimates for those dates. The Population Estimates Program provides additional information including historical and intercensal estimates, evaluation estimates, demographic analysis, and research papers on its website: http://www.census.gov/popest/index.html.2014pepsubctygeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/2014/pep/subcty
Time Series Business Dynamics Statistics: Firm StatisticsThe Business Dynamics Statistics (BDS) is a public use data set of annual aggregate statistics describing establishment openings and closings, firm startups, job creation and destruction by firm size, age, industrial sector, and state. For more information about the dataset set http://www.census.gov/ces/dataproducts/bds/index.htmlN/AbdsfirmsgeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/bds/firms
Economic Indicators Time Series - U.S. International Trade in Goods and ServicesThe U.S. Census Bureau.s economic indicator surveys provide monthly and quarterly data that are timely, reliable, and offer comprehensive measures of the U.S. economy. These surveys produce a variety of statistics covering construction, housing, international trade, retail trade, wholesale trade, services and manufacturing. The survey data provide measures of economic activity that allow analysis of economic performance and inform business investment and policy decisions. Other data included, which are not considered principal economic indicators, are the Quarterly Summary of State & Local Taxes, Quarterly Survey of Public Pensions, and the Manufactured Homes Survey. For information on the reliability and use of the data, including important notes on estimation and sampling variance, seasonal adjustment, measures of sampling variability, and other information pertinent to the economic indicators, visit the individual programs' webpages - http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/briefroom/BriefRm.N/AeitsftdgeographiesvariablesN/AN/Adocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/eits/ftd
Economic Indicators Time Series - Housing Vacancies and HomeownershipThe U.S. Census Bureau.s economic indicator surveys provide monthly and quarterly data that are timely, reliable, and offer comprehensive measures of the U.S. economy. These surveys produce a variety of statistics covering construction, housing, international trade, retail trade, wholesale trade, services and manufacturing. The survey data provide measures of economic activity that allow analysis of economic performance and inform business investment and policy decisions. Other data included, which are not considered principal economic indicators, are the Quarterly Summary of State & Local Taxes, Quarterly Survey of Public Pensions, and the Manufactured Homes Survey. For information on the reliability and use of the data, including important notes on estimation and sampling variance, seasonal adjustment, measures of sampling variability, and other information pertinent to the economic indicators, visit the individual programs' webpages - http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/briefroom/BriefRm.N/AeitshvgeographiesvariablesN/AN/Adocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/eits/hv
Economic Indicators Time Series - Manufacturers' Shipments, Inventories, and OrdersThe U.S. Census Bureau.s economic indicator surveys provide monthly and quarterly data that are timely, reliable, and offer comprehensive measures of the U.S. economy. These surveys produce a variety of statistics covering construction, housing, international trade, retail trade, wholesale trade, services and manufacturing. The survey data provide measures of economic activity that allow analysis of economic performance and inform business investment and policy decisions. Other data included, which are not considered principal economic indicators, are the Quarterly Summary of State & Local Taxes, Quarterly Survey of Public Pensions, and the Manufactured Homes Survey. For information on the reliability and use of the data, including important notes on estimation and sampling variance, seasonal adjustment, measures of sampling variability, and other information pertinent to the economic indicators, visit the individual programs' webpages - http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/briefroom/BriefRm.N/Aeitsm3geographiesvariablesN/AN/Adocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/eits/m3
Economic Indicators Time Series - Advance Monthly Sales for Retail and Food ServicesThe U.S. Census Bureau.s economic indicator surveys provide monthly and quarterly data that are timely, reliable, and offer comprehensive measures of the U.S. economy. These surveys produce a variety of statistics covering construction, housing, international trade, retail trade, wholesale trade, services and manufacturing. The survey data provide measures of economic activity that allow analysis of economic performance and inform business investment and policy decisions. Other data included, which are not considered principal economic indicators, are the Quarterly Summary of State & Local Taxes, Quarterly Survey of Public Pensions, and the Manufactured Homes Survey. For information on the reliability and use of the data, including important notes on estimation and sampling variance, seasonal adjustment, measures of sampling variability, and other information pertinent to the economic indicators, visit the individual programs' webpages - http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/briefroom/BriefRm.N/AeitsmartsgeographiesvariablesN/AN/Adocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/eits/marts
Economic Indicators Time Series - Manufactured Homes SurveyThe U.S. Census Bureau.s economic indicator surveys provide monthly and quarterly data that are timely, reliable, and offer comprehensive measures of the U.S. economy. These surveys produce a variety of statistics covering construction, housing, international trade, retail trade, wholesale trade, services and manufacturing. The survey data provide measures of economic activity that allow analysis of economic performance and inform business investment and policy decisions. Other data included, which are not considered principal economic indicators, are the Quarterly Summary of State & Local Taxes, Quarterly Survey of Public Pensions, and the Manufactured Homes Survey. For information on the reliability and use of the data, including important notes on estimation and sampling variance, seasonal adjustment, measures of sampling variability, and other information pertinent to the economic indicators, visit the individual programs' webpages - http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/briefroom/BriefRm.N/AeitsmhsgeographiesvariablesN/AN/Adocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/eits/mhs
Economic Indicators Time Series - Monthly Retail Trade and Food ServicesThe U.S. Census Bureau.s economic indicator surveys provide monthly and quarterly data that are timely, reliable, and offer comprehensive measures of the U.S. economy. These surveys produce a variety of statistics covering construction, housing, international trade, retail trade, wholesale trade, services and manufacturing. The survey data provide measures of economic activity that allow analysis of economic performance and inform business investment and policy decisions. Other data included, which are not considered principal economic indicators, are the Quarterly Summary of State & Local Taxes, Quarterly Survey of Public Pensions, and the Manufactured Homes Survey. For information on the reliability and use of the data, including important notes on estimation and sampling variance, seasonal adjustment, measures of sampling variability, and other information pertinent to the economic indicators, visit the individual programs' webpages - http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/briefroom/BriefRm.N/AeitsmrtsgeographiesvariablesN/AN/Adocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/eits/mrts
Economic Indicators Time Series - Manufacturing and Trade Inventories and SalesThe U.S. Census Bureau.s economic indicator surveys provide monthly and quarterly data that are timely, reliable, and offer comprehensive measures of the U.S. economy. These surveys produce a variety of statistics covering construction, housing, international trade, retail trade, wholesale trade, services and manufacturing. The survey data provide measures of economic activity that allow analysis of economic performance and inform business investment and policy decisions. Other data included, which are not considered principal economic indicators, are the Quarterly Summary of State & Local Taxes, Quarterly Survey of Public Pensions, and the Manufactured Homes Survey. For information on the reliability and use of the data, including important notes on estimation and sampling variance, seasonal adjustment, measures of sampling variability, and other information pertinent to the economic indicators, visit the individual programs' webpages - http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/briefroom/BriefRm.N/AeitsmtisgeographiesvariablesN/AN/Adocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/eits/mtis
Economic Indicators Time Series - Monthly Wholesale Trade: Sales and InventoriesThe U.S. Census Bureau.s economic indicator surveys provide monthly and quarterly data that are timely, reliable, and offer comprehensive measures of the U.S. economy. These surveys produce a variety of statistics covering construction, housing, international trade, retail trade, wholesale trade, services and manufacturing. The survey data provide measures of economic activity that allow analysis of economic performance and inform business investment and policy decisions. Other data included, which are not considered principal economic indicators, are the Quarterly Summary of State & Local Taxes, Quarterly Survey of Public Pensions, and the Manufactured Homes Survey. For information on the reliability and use of the data, including important notes on estimation and sampling variance, seasonal adjustment, measures of sampling variability, and other information pertinent to the economic indicators, visit the individual programs' webpages - http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/briefroom/BriefRm.N/AeitsmwtsgeographiesvariablesN/AN/Adocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/eits/mwts
Economic Indicators Time Series - Quarterly Financial ReportThe U.S. Census Bureau.s economic indicator surveys provide monthly and quarterly data that are timely, reliable, and offer comprehensive measures of the U.S. economy. These surveys produce a variety of statistics covering construction, housing, international trade, retail trade, wholesale trade, services and manufacturing. The survey data provide measures of economic activity that allow analysis of economic performance and inform business investment and policy decisions. Other data included, which are not considered principal economic indicators, are the Quarterly Summary of State & Local Taxes, Quarterly Survey of Public Pensions, and the Manufactured Homes Survey. For information on the reliability and use of the data, including important notes on estimation and sampling variance, seasonal adjustment, measures of sampling variability, and other information pertinent to the economic indicators, visit the individual programs' webpages - http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/briefroom/BriefRm.N/AeitsqfrgeographiesvariablesN/AN/Adocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/eits/qfr
Economic Indicators Time Series - Quarterly Survey of Public PensionsThe U.S. Census Bureau.s economic indicator surveys provide monthly and quarterly data that are timely, reliable, and offer comprehensive measures of the U.S. economy. These surveys produce a variety of statistics covering construction, housing, international trade, retail trade, wholesale trade, services and manufacturing. The survey data provide measures of economic activity that allow analysis of economic performance and inform business investment and policy decisions. Other data included, which are not considered principal economic indicators, are the Quarterly Summary of State & Local Taxes, Quarterly Survey of Public Pensions, and the Manufactured Homes Survey. For information on the reliability and use of the data, including important notes on estimation and sampling variance, seasonal adjustment, measures of sampling variability, and other information pertinent to the economic indicators, visit the individual programs' webpages - http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/briefroom/BriefRm.N/AeitsqprgeographiesvariablesN/AN/Adocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/eits/qpr
Economic Indicators Time Series - Quarterly Services SurveyThe U.S. Census Bureau.s economic indicator surveys provide monthly and quarterly data that are timely, reliable, and offer comprehensive measures of the U.S. economy. These surveys produce a variety of statistics covering construction, housing, international trade, retail trade, wholesale trade, services and manufacturing. The survey data provide measures of economic activity that allow analysis of economic performance and inform business investment and policy decisions. Other data included, which are not considered principal economic indicators, are the Quarterly Summary of State & Local Taxes, Quarterly Survey of Public Pensions, and the Manufactured Homes Survey. For information on the reliability and use of the data, including important notes on estimation and sampling variance, seasonal adjustment, measures of sampling variability, and other information pertinent to the economic indicators, visit the individual programs' webpages - http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/briefroom/BriefRm.N/AeitsqssgeographiesvariablesN/AN/Adocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/eits/qss
Economic Indicators Time Series - Quarterly Summary of State & Local TaxesThe U.S. Census Bureau.s economic indicator surveys provide monthly and quarterly data that are timely, reliable, and offer comprehensive measures of the U.S. economy. These surveys produce a variety of statistics covering construction, housing, international trade, retail trade, wholesale trade, services and manufacturing. The survey data provide measures of economic activity that allow analysis of economic performance and inform business investment and policy decisions. Other data included, which are not considered principal economic indicators, are the Quarterly Summary of State & Local Taxes, Quarterly Survey of Public Pensions, and the Manufactured Homes Survey. For information on the reliability and use of the data, including important notes on estimation and sampling variance, seasonal adjustment, measures of sampling variability, and other information pertinent to the economic indicators, visit the individual programs' webpages - http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/briefroom/BriefRm.N/AeitsqtaxgeographiesvariablesN/AN/Adocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/eits/qtax
Economic Indicators Time Series - New Residential ConstructionThe U.S. Census Bureau.s economic indicator surveys provide monthly and quarterly data that are timely, reliable, and offer comprehensive measures of the U.S. economy. These surveys produce a variety of statistics covering construction, housing, international trade, retail trade, wholesale trade, services and manufacturing. The survey data provide measures of economic activity that allow analysis of economic performance and inform business investment and policy decisions. Other data included, which are not considered principal economic indicators, are the Quarterly Summary of State & Local Taxes, Quarterly Survey of Public Pensions, and the Manufactured Homes Survey. For information on the reliability and use of the data, including important notes on estimation and sampling variance, seasonal adjustment, measures of sampling variability, and other information pertinent to the economic indicators, visit the individual programs' webpages - http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/briefroom/BriefRm.N/AeitsresconstgeographiesvariablesN/AN/Adocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/eits/resconst
Economic Indicators Time Series - New Home SalesThe U.S. Census Bureau.s economic indicator surveys provide monthly and quarterly data that are timely, reliable, and offer comprehensive measures of the U.S. economy. These surveys produce a variety of statistics covering construction, housing, international trade, retail trade, wholesale trade, services and manufacturing. The survey data provide measures of economic activity that allow analysis of economic performance and inform business investment and policy decisions. Other data included, which are not considered principal economic indicators, are the Quarterly Summary of State & Local Taxes, Quarterly Survey of Public Pensions, and the Manufactured Homes Survey. For information on the reliability and use of the data, including important notes on estimation and sampling variance, seasonal adjustment, measures of sampling variability, and other information pertinent to the economic indicators, visit the individual programs' webpages - http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/briefroom/BriefRm.N/AeitsressalesgeographiesvariablesN/AN/Adocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/eits/ressales
Economic Indicators Time Series - Construction SpendingThe U.S. Census Bureau.s economic indicator surveys provide monthly and quarterly data that are timely, reliable, and offer comprehensive measures of the U.S. economy. These surveys produce a variety of statistics covering construction, housing, international trade, retail trade, wholesale trade, services and manufacturing. The survey data provide measures of economic activity that allow analysis of economic performance and inform business investment and policy decisions. Other data included, which are not considered principal economic indicators, are the Quarterly Summary of State & Local Taxes, Quarterly Survey of Public Pensions, and the Manufactured Homes Survey. For information on the reliability and use of the data, including important notes on estimation and sampling variance, seasonal adjustment, measures of sampling variability, and other information pertinent to the economic indicators, visit the individual programs' webpages - http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/briefroom/BriefRm.N/AeitsvipgeographiesvariablesN/Aexamplesdocumentationhttp://niaaa.census.gov/data/eits/vip